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The Building with The Bell

Looking straight across, the fan light, the strong vertical lines and the cross create a strong visual contrast with each other as well the light.

Looking straight across, the fan light, the strong vertical lines and the cross create a strong visual contrast with each other as well the light.

Looking down from the 11th floor, you see the escalators at the bottom and the offices surrounding the atrium. I liked the fact that my feet's reflection against the glass almost give an impression of me 'walking' over the empty space.

Looking down from the 11th floor, you see the escalators at the bottom and the offices surrounding the atrium. I liked the fact that my feet’s reflection against the glass almost give an impression of me ‘walking’ over the empty space.

It is not often that I get the opportunity (or misfortune – however you see it) to enter one of the towering buildings that loom over you as your bus winds and grinds its way through the CBD of London.
A while ago I visited the Lloyd’s building where as you walk into the central atrium, you are greeted by the now-silent Lutine Bell (it would be rung once to notify of a ship sinking, twice for the recovery of a sunken ship), a log book with details going further back than the sinking of the Titanic and 11 storeys of open space above.
With its harsh 80s architecture, from the outside it is hard to imagine the more obvious beauty that is quite literally at its heart – although there is a certain Charlie and the Chocolate Factory-esque thrill to ascending 11 floors entirely on the outside of a building.
The view from the top: spectacular.

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